An Expert Addresses Fertility Concerns for Hodgkin Lymphoma Patients

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Topics include: Treatments

How does Hodgkin lymphoma treatment affect fertility? Hodgkn lymphoma experts Dr. Andrew Evens, from Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, and Dr. Joshua Brody, from Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, offer expert perspectives on first- and second-line treatment approaches and how they can impact fertility in men and women. Watch now to find out more.

This program is sponsored through a grant from Seattle Genetics. This organization has no editorial control. It is produced solely by Patient Power.

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Transcript

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

Andrew Schorr:

I have questions, but first of all, for younger patients, what about fertility? So, is fertility a discussion and a concern with some of your traditional approaches, anyway?

Dr. Evens:

Oh, it is. Thankfully, with the most common platform that Dr. Brody mentioned—ABVD—it’s very low. I don’t know if it’s zero, but it’s probably single digits.

Dr. Brody:            

Fertility problems are very low.

Dr. Evens:

Fertility problems are very low, yeah, in terms of becoming infertile from the treatment, but you still have the discussion because for a 21-year-old, 2 percent might be enough, and you wanna have that discussion about it. Now, when it’s a relapse and transplant, that goes much higher in terms of infertility, so we’ll think about how to approach that, whether a man or a woman, the different ways to help with that.

Esther Schorr:     

What about with the new treatments, though, that you’re talking about? Are those lower risk of infertility?

Dr. Brody:            

So, with the newer combination we mentioned that got studied in the frontline setting, we have evidence that people still have good fertility afterwards. We don’t have enough long-term data to say it as thoroughly as we can say it for the ABVD, but I will say this: As Andy said, the real risk to fertility is people have to go to second-line therapies if the first line doesn’t work, to the autologous bone marrow transplant. There’s a real fertility problem with those later therapies, those more aggressive therapies.

So, if we can just avoid those later therapies by giving better first-line therapy, that would be a huge benefit and another reason to do those better first-line therapies.

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

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Page last updated on July 15, 2019